The Hyphen





=83. Compound Words

Put a hyphen between the members of a compound

word. Words compounded with the following prefixes and suffixes are

generally hyphenated: able-, brother-, by-, cross-, -elect,

ex-, father-, great-, half-, -hand, mother-, open-,

public-, quarter-, -rate, self-. In particular, hyphenate the

following words:



able-bodied

attorney-general

balk-line

base-hit

base-line

basket-ball

brother-in-law

bucket-shop

by-law

by-product

court-martial

cross-examine

ex-president

father-in-law

full-back

goal-line

goal-post

good-by

great-grandfather

half-back

half-witted

home-stretch

judge-elect

kick-off

kick-out

law-abiding

life-saving

line-up

mail-box

man-of-war

mother-in-law

office-seeker

old-fashioned

post-mortem

post-office

president-elect

quarter-back

quarter-stretch

second-rate

shop-girl

short-stop

side-lines

so-called (a.)

son-in-law

spit-ball

to-day

to-morrow

to-night



84. Words Written Solid.--Words compounded of the following prefixes and

suffixes are generally written solid: a-, after-, ante-, anti-,

auto-, bi-, demi-, -ever, grand-, -holder, in-, inter-,

intra-, -less, mid-, mis-, off-, on-, over-, post-,

re-, -some, sub-, super-, tri-, un-, under-, up-,

-ward, -wise, -with. The following should be written solid:



anyone

anyway (adv.)

anywhere

awhile

baseball

billboard

bipartizan

bondholder

carload

classmate

corespondent

downstairs

everyday (a.)

everyone

fireproof

football

footlights

footpad

gateman

holdup

inasmuch

infield

ironclad

juryman

landlady

lawsuit

letterhead

linesman

midnight

misprint

misspell

nevertheless

newcomer

nonunion

northeast

northwest

Oddfellows

officeholder

oneself

outfield

pallbearer

paymaster

postcard

posthaste

postmaster

rewrite

saloonkeeper

schoolboy

schoolgirl

semicolon

shopkeeper

sidewalk

skyscraper

snowstorm

southeast

southwest

taxpayer

typewriter

upstairs



=85. Words Written Separately

Write the following as two words:



all right

any time

back yard

every time

ex officio

fellow man

half dollar

half dozen

half nelson

mass meeting

no one

pay roll

police court

per cent

pro tem

some one

some way

squeeze play



=86. Compound Numbers

Compound numbers between twenty and a hundred,

when spelled out, should have a hyphen: as, twenty-one, forty-three.



=87. Word Division

When dividing a word at the end of a line, observe

the following rules:



1. Do not break a syllable: as, cre-ditable, attemp-ted, for

cred-itable, attempt-ed.



2. Do not divide a monosyllable: as, mob-bed, tho-ugh.



3. Do not separate a consonant from a vowel that affects its

pronunciation: as, nec-essity for ne-cessity.



4. Do not divide a diphthong or separate two successive vowels, one of

which is silent: as, bo-wing, pe-ople, for bow-ing, peo-ple.



5. Do not separate a syllable that has been added to a word by the

addition of an s: as, financ-es.



6. Do not divide hyphenated words except at the syllable where the

regular hyphen comes: as, pocket-book, fool-killer.



7. Do not make awkward divisions: as, noth-ing, crack-le.



8. Do not begin a line with a hyphen.



9. As a rule, avoid dividing a word at the end of a line and never

divide one at the end of a page.





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