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Present Tense
Sing. Plural ...

Errors
In the following examples the word or words in parenthe...

What Conversation Is And What It Is Not
Good conversation is more easily defined by what it is not ...

Figurative Language
In Figurative Language we employ words in such a way th...

Each Otherone Another
Each other refers to two, one another to more than two. "Jone...

Ellipsis
Errors in ellipsis occur chiefly with prepositions. His ob...

Writing For Newspapers
The newspaper nowadays goes into every home in t...

Power Of Fitness Tact And Nicety In Business Words
There is an aspect of business words which has to do with s...


THREE ESSENTIALS




Divisions of Grammar Definitions - Etymology.

The three essentials of the English language are: Purity, Perspicuity
and Precision.

By Purity is signified the use of good English. It precludes the use of
all slang words, vulgar phrases, obsolete terms, foreign idioms, ambiguous
expressions or any ungrammatical language whatsoever. Neither does it
sanction the use of any newly coined word until such word is adopted by
the best writers and speakers.

Perspicuity demands the clearest expression of thought conveyed in
unequivocal language, so that there may be no misunderstanding whatever
of the thought or idea the speaker or writer wishes to convey. All
ambiguous words, words of double meaning and words that might possibly be
construed in a sense different from that intended, are strictly
forbidden. Perspicuity requires a style at once clear and comprehensive
and entirely free from pomp and pedantry and affectation or any straining
after effect.

Precision requires concise and exact expression, free from redundancy
and tautology, a style terse and clear and simple enough to enable the
hearer or reader to comprehend immediately the meaning of the speaker or
writer. It forbids, on the one hand, all long and involved sentences,
and, on the other, those that are too short and abrupt. Its object is to
strike the golden mean in such a way as to rivet the attention of the
hearer or reader on the words uttered or written.





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