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First Personal Pronoun
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The Split Infinitive
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EACH, EVERY, EITHER, NEITHER




Common Stumbling Blocks - Peculiar Constructions - Misused Forms.

These words are continually misapplied. Each can be applied to two
or any higher number of objects to signify every one of the number
independently. Every requires more than two to be spoken of and
denotes all the persons or things taken separately. Either
denotes one or the other of two, and should not be used to include
both. Neither is the negative of either, denoting not the other,
and not the one, and relating to two persons or things considered
separately.

The following examples illustrate the correct usage of these words:

Each man of the crew received a reward.

Every man in the regiment displayed bravery.

We can walk on either side of the street.

Neither of the two is to blame.





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