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CAPITAL LETTERS




Principal Points - Illustrations - Capital Letters.

Capital letters are used to give emphasis to or call attention to
certain words to distinguish them from the context. In manuscripts they
may be written small or large and are indicated by lines drawn
underneath, two lines for SMALL CAPITALS and three lines for CAPITALS.

Some authors, notably Carlyle, make such use of Capitals that it
degenerates into an abuse. They should only be used in their proper
places as given in the table below.

(1) The first word of every sentence, in fact the first word in writing
of any kind should begin with a capital; as, "Time flies." "My dear
friend."

(2) Every direct quotation should begin with a capital; "Dewey said,--
'Fire, when you're ready, Gridley!'"

(3) Every direct question commences with a capital; "Let me ask you;
'How old are you?'"

(4) Every line of poetry begins with a capital; "Breathes there a man
with soul so dead?"

(5) Every numbered clause calls for a capital: "The witness asserts: (1)
That he saw the man attacked; (2) That he saw him fall; (3) That he
saw his assailant flee."

(6) The headings of essays and chapters should be wholly in capitals;

(7) In the titles of books, nouns, pronouns, adjectives and adverbs
should begin with a capital; as, "Johnson's Lives of the Poets."

(8) In the Roman notation numbers are denoted by capitals; as, I II III V





Next: X L C D M1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000.

Previous: PUNCTUATION



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